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Mathematician

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Mathematics underpins scientific research and development, as well as finance, engineering, economics and ICT. Graduates in either pure maths or applied maths use mathematical calculations in a wide range of work sectors to help describe, analyse and solve problems. Many jobs that require a high level of expertise in maths don’t have the word ‘mathematician' in the title. Terms such as analyst, modeller, programmer and even engineer may be used.

The Work

You could be:

Pay

The figures below are only a guide. Actual pay rates may vary depending on:

The starting salaries for mathematics graduates range from £20,000 to £30,000 a year. With postgraduate qualifications, salaries can rise to around £40,000 a year. Maths graduates earn some of the highest salaries.

After a few years' experience, applied mathematicians working in IT can earn up to around £55,000 a year. With more experience, and moving into a senior position, you could be earning £70,000 or more, especially in the financial sector.

Conditions

Workforce Employment Status

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Getting In

With a mathematics degree you can work in a wide range of jobs including business, accountancy and finance, teaching, engineering, electronics, scientific work (including meteorology and oceanography), economics, ICT and operational research.

You might work in a research institution, a university, the Civil Service, in business, finance or industry. There are also opportunities in information technology.

Workforce Education Levels (UK)

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Job Outlook Scotland

Employment

Unemployment

Percentage of workforce registered as unemployed (Scotland)

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Job Outlook Scotland and UK

  Scotland
2019
3527
1.6 %
FALL
2024
3472
  United Kingdom
2019
40145
0 %
RISE
2024
40148

LMI data powered by EMSI UK

What Does it Take?

You should be able to:

You should have:

Training

Getting On

More Information

The Future Morph website www.futuremorph.org shows you some of the amazing and unexpected places that studying science, technology, engineering and maths can take you.

Contacts

The following organisations may be able to provide further information.

Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA)
Tel: 01702 354020
E-mail: post@ima.org.uk
Website: http://www.ima.org.uk/
Website (2): http://www.mathscareers.org.uk
Twitter: @IMAmaths
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/7633226353/

London Mathematical Society (LMS)
Tel: 020 7637 3686
Website: http://www.lms.ac.uk/
Twitter: @LondMathSoc

Despite its name, the LMS is not simply a London society. It is a major UK learned society for the mathematical sciences.

Mathematical Association (MA)
Tel: 0116 221 0013
E-mail: office@m-a.org.uk
Website: http://www.m-a.org.uk/
Twitter: @Mathematical_A
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/136275943093334/

Science Council
Tel: 020 3434 2020
E-mail: enquiries@sciencecouncil.org
Website: http://www.sciencecouncil.org/
Website (2): http://www.futuremorph.org/
Twitter: @Science_Council

The Science Council provides the quality assurance system for those working in science. They set the standards for professional registration for practising scientists and science technicians across all scientific disciplines. Those scientists who reach the required standards are recognised by the following designations CSci, CSciTeach, RSci and RSciTech.

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